Dispatches

Malawi Center Employs Bikes            to Fight Trafficking

Giving children and young people a skill for life makes them more "valuable" to their families and communities

Mchinji is near Malawi’s border with Zambia. The Mchinji Rescue Center in Malawi is supported by the Salvation Army International Development team (SAID) and was set up in 2006 to help children and young people who have been rescued from trafficking for exploitative labor, herding cattle all day or working at night in a bar. A bike enterprise called Salvo Cycles supports the service by generating much needed income. The Salvo Cycles workshop's manager, Victor, leads the workshop and is responsible for sales and marketing as well as repairs. He visits villages in the area, offering basic bike repairs and promoting the workshop as a source of affordable bikes for villagers who can use the bikes to get their produce to market.

 

Activities at the Mchinji Centre

The children are housed, fed, clothed and go to school while staying at the center. When ready, usually after a few months, they are reintegrated with their families and communities. Staff at the center carry out sensitization and awareness raising activities in communities in the district to help ensure that adults understand their responsibilities for protecting children from traffickers. Some of the children are also trained in basic mechanics and bike maintenance, giving them a skill for life. This helps to make them more economically "valuable" to their families and communities and thus less likely to be re-trafficked.

OUR IMPACT

  • Reduces child trafficking
  • Provides and income to pay for services
  • Provides bikes for volunteers who travel to villages to promote anti-child trafficking

BIKES SENT TO DATE

1,824

Source: Salvation Army Malawi http:/www.re-cycle.org

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